David merkur dating spreadsheet

” But after several more people contacted me about the news item — including a former girlfriend who had no knowledge of my spreadsheet but apparently knows me all too well — I started to think that, more than just yet another Internet meme, such spreadsheets actually captured the zeitgeist of modern dating.

I, like David Merkur, work in finance and stare at Excel for 12 hours a day.

Sometimes, I email a woman who seems a perfect match yet receive no response.

‘SORT’ OF CREEPY: An investment banker kept a color-coded spreadsheet of women he dated — re-created in part and blurred out for privacy here (above) — arranging them by looks, impressions of first dates and interest in future pursuit. Merkur told Jezebel that he sent Arielle the spreadsheet because “she works with spreadsheets a lot, too” and she “seemed like a very sweet girl.” “I won’t be using ever again,” he said.

Merkur ranked Arielle a nine out of ten for her online appearance and described her as ‘very pretty, sweet and down to earth/great personality’.

As well as online pictures, age and appearance scores, he also kept track of message communications and whether to monitor the dates ‘closely’ or ‘casually’.

For one date named Liliana, who scored a 9.5, Merkur wrote, “Looks beautiful; from coastal Romania; Chanel make-up artist.” OPINION: REAL MEN CAN CLOSE THE DEAL WITHOUT OPENING EXCEL But after a few conversations and Facebook chats, Merkur noted that her old boyfriend “might be back in the picture.” He made himself another note to call her after she returned from an April trip to Florida.

For his ladies, he kept meticulous text- message records under “dates of message communication,” documenting when he sent a message and when he received one.

I hope this email doesn't backfire, because I really had a great time and hope to hang again soon :)."Arielle, who Merkur described as "very pretty, sweet and down to earth" with a "great personality", forwarded the email to one of her friends. He met eight of the women he dated through the internet dating website and the other four through friends and family. For Liliana, who scored a 9.5, he wrote: "Looks beautiful; from coastal Romania; Chanel make-up artist," but later added how her old boyfriend "might be back in the picture"."Mixed bag of pictures, but great bod; works in my building, also in finance; well travelled," Merkur wrote of another women.‘SORT’ OF CREEPY: An investment banker kept a color-coded spreadsheet of women he dated — re-created in part and blurred out for privacy here (above) — arranging them by looks, impressions of first dates and interest in future pursuit. “I screwed some people, and I screwed myself.” Arielle, a Long Island native, couldn’t be reached.( ) A data-driven investment banker kept a detailed spreadsheet of 12 women he was chasing — coldly ranking their appearance on a scale of 1 to 10 — only to see his master plan backfire when he foolishly sent the file to one of them. The compilation shows that Merkur was e-mailing, texting and dating several women at the same time in late March and early April. Cortney, a 24-year-old Chicago native, got a 7.5 in looks but lost points after she blew off a scheduled date.The banker, named by the New York Post as David Merkur, went on a date with "Arielle", 26, a woman he met on Match.com, described in his spreadsheet as "very pretty, sweet and down to earth/great personality".He also ranked her 9.0 (out of 10) for online appearance. This was an honest attempt to stay organised." The Big Short, the film adaptation of Michael Lewis' book of the same name about the causes of the financial crisis, opens in UK cinemas this weekend.

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